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Kathryn Hunter

We're back Kc, did you miss us? We sure missed y'all!! Tonight we have a fun interview from Local Designer Kathryn Hunter, CEO of Voodoo Hippie Clothing!




      HOW HAS YOUR PRACTICE CHANGED OVER TIME? 


     “That is a hard question for me because I have about 100 answers to it, first off, this incarnation of my work is only about 2.5 years old so it's pretty much changing daily as I learn. I would say though, as a whole, my work, no matter what medium it happens to be in has a definite theme now, where at the beginning, it was a lot of whatever I happened to fancy myself into at the time, I think with age, I have settled into myself, and my work has pretty much done the same thing, no apologies, no masks, no bs.”



HOW DO YOU BALANCE YOUR WORK/ PERSONAL LIFE


   “The short answer is, I don't. The almost as short answer is that I am a capricorn in every sense. my work Is my personal life and I'm pretty sure I wouldn't be happy unless it were, My husband is also an artist,a musician, he has his thing and i have mine, when we both happen to run into each other outside our respective studios, we hang out, we met on a tour we were both a part of, so that part of our lives has never been a mystery to each other. It's very symbiotic and I feel fortunate to have a partner who 'gets it'.”



ANY STRUGGLES YOU’VE HAD AS AN ARTIST?


"So many. the obvious ones of course, money being tight,supplies going up and people spending less, rejection, and so on and so forth, but honestlyI knew all that was coming when I started down this road, and being prepared has made those things less of a struggle and more necessary annoyance. I mean, it can't all be fun and games right? I think the biggest one, The most unexpected kick in the teeth one, and it's one I still reckon with now and again, is remembering to keep some for myself. The real struggle I guess is dealing with things when I don't remember to.,. What I mean by that, is that artists, all of us, no matter what we do orif it's a job or a hobby, we put ourselves into our work, A piece of ourselves, into everythingwe make, Over the course of a lifetime, or in my case 43 years so far, and countless worksof art, That is a LOt of pieces, If we sell or give away or lose or throw out all of them without remembering to keep some of ourselves inside us, eventually there isn't much left. It can be a bit jading to feel like you are trading so much of yourself for money So.... We have to keep some, not the work, ourselves.”



WHAT ROLE DO YOU PLAY AS AN ARTIST IN SOCIETY?


       “I think that would be a question for society. The role I would like to believe I play is to be someone that helped people to overcome the view of themselves that society has put there, I mostly work on clothing right? so I want people to wear the pieces they like, and feel as amazing as they should in it, as freaking phenomenal as they look and are. Even if society says they shouldn't be wearing it for whatever reason, they aren't built for it, it wasn't made for them. All of that is folly, If they LOVE it, it is for them, and they are breathtaking in it.”



WHAT DOES YOUR ARTWORK AIM TO SAY?


       “I want my work to be a tool for self discovery, I want someone who never thought they could wear a crop top to end up with one of mine and never want to take it off. I want someone to buy a dress from me on the day they shave their beard off and start their new life. I want those little pieces of me to have front row seats to all those moments of self love and brave self discovery  and be a part of them forever, I don't aim for it to say anything, I want to hear what it helps others to say. Well, that, and "Tie dye isn't just for hippies".”



HOW DO YOU PRICE YOUR WORK?


     “I am terrible at this. it's both priceless and worthless at the same time, How do you put a tag on that? I actually stopped tagging my work for most live events, because it fosters more interaction between me and the people shopping, and I have to admit, I just wing it most of the time. Sometimes my price is based purely on the love I see for the item in the customer's eyes, It's never really been about money for me, but that said, i know that my (and all other) art is worth something, and I do fancy that i have a system, that incorporates materials (with clothing, quality usually doesn't come all that cheap, and this art has the largest overhead I have ever dealt with in my years as a working artist), as well as utilities (my water bill has at least tripled since I started dyeworking), time and whatever else, but frankly most of the time it ends up just being a number that popped into my head that I decided was fair. I kind of wish we could go back to the barter system, I would happily take two chickens and a barrel of apples for a killer dress. Who wouldn't right now considering the current price of eggs?”



ARE THERE ANY PARTICULAR INTERIOR SPACES OR ARTIST THAT HAVE INFLUENCED YOU?    


 “It is a pretty eclectic array. Frida Khalo, Aunia Kahn, Sailor Jerry, the person who drew the internet troll face (i have no idea, i just see that face in all sorts of things, it's weird and I justdon't question it). It's not really an interior space as one would conjure up by definition,but my work is hugely influenced by what's inside the earth, under the surface of things, like levels of the earth when its cut into slices, rock and crystal layers, I like the idea of cracking open the earth and wearing it as a skirt.”      


Model: Jazzmine Woods


Model: Bekah Dunbar


Model: Morgin Riley


As always, a HUGE thank you KC for making all this possible for our community, and shout out to Kathryn Hunter for opening up and sharing a bit of her story with us today!




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